The Good Life?…

I visited home this weekend and was pleasantly surprised by my sister’s allotment and the amount she has managed to harvest from it of late.

This got me thinking, why do more people not do this local Council’s often have plots available at a very reasonable price? She gave me baby pak choi, strawberries, shallots, beetroot, round carrots and curly kale but is currently also growing/has recently harvested courgettes, brussel sprouts, broccoli, lettuce, raspberries, rocket, French beans, peas, gooseberries, blackcurrants, cauliflowers, sweet potatoes, celeriac, red cabbage and rhubarb as well as an assortment of fresh herbs.

People think having an allotment is a time consuming exercise but, whilst it can be somewhat addictive, she has 3 young children and still manages to grow and harvest all of the above. In fact, she cites some of the main reasons for having the allotment as drumming up the children’s interest in veg, keeping their intake at least partially organic, getting them even more active and saving money in the process.

So when it comes down ‘brass tax’, unless it’s a large plot, you will not be entirely ‘veg self-sufficient’ off of it but you will get amazing produce all year round to supplement your diet and, flavour wise, there is nothing like it.

An example of the cost of the upkeep of an allotment is, with my sister’s plot for example, £60 to the Council per year, £30 for seeds etc, a small amount for materials (although you can scavenge most/improvise) meaning a total yearly cost of around £100. For the amount of fruit and veg you will get in that year together with the enjoyment of growing your own produce, you can’t say fairer than that.

 

TVL

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Nutrition

2 responses to “The Good Life?…

  1. Dude, more people would, but the waiting list for allotments – particularly in cities like Leeds and more ‘engaged’ communities – are quite literally YEARS long. The question should be not why people don’t do it, but why more people don’t go in for landshare schemes and why councils don’t give over more space to community growing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s